Photo credit: Kirk Sigurdson

Photo credit: Kirk Sigurdson

 

8 years in a sacred site...

 

Climbing the top of Severed Hand.

Climbing the top of Severed Hand.

 

SPOTS OF THE FAWN WEBSITE  is a personal memoir as well as a cursory look at a documented study of a prehistoric sacred site, known as a ceremonial way. While scouting, photographing and mapping this location over a period of 8 years,  the author began to experience what is known to the mainstream as "the paranormal." The experiences were not as unfamiliar as one would think;  the author has been traditionally vision questing all her life.   She has also studied  "earth's power spots" in her native land; the Pacific Northwest of America.

Spots of the Fawn are "power" places where the natural forces of the Earth are more pronounced.  They are composed of magnetic anomalies and are high in telluric energy (electricity). They are found over mineral rich deposits, in areas of dense Granite and crystalline based stone and over fault lines and underground streams.  These things are all conductive. By definition they are high in eletro-magnetics.  These energetic influences are known to induce altered states as demonstrated in laboratory studies.  Indigenous people built 100 percent of their sacred sites upon them for this reason.  The Hopi called them Spots of the Fawn.  They can be found dotting the entire surface of the Earth.  You might be in one right now and not even know it. 

Vision questing is an ancient method of altering one's state of consciousness and becoming visionary in order to perceive "the spirits." What are spirits? Some say they are energetic life forms, autonomous and conscious. Others say they are a part of our subconscious rooted in Jung's archetypes; mythic and universal symbols which are created by our deep subconscious to better communicate with our selves.   After experiencing involuntary visionary states in ordinary time, while working within the archaeology of Severed Hand, a prehistoric ceremonial way,  it  became the author's intention to study the relationship of this  particular site, built upon a magnetic anomaly, and its effects on altered states of consciousness and reality itself.  

"I have vision quested all my life.  And never have I experienced an altered state where I was totally unaware I was in one."  -- Alyssa Adisi Waya Alexandria

It is the author's feeling that while working in the site now known as Severed Hand, she experienced involuntary altered states of consciousness which were virtually undetectable to her.  Yet, her visionary experiences, in real time, tell her otherwise, based on her upbringing.

 

Traditional Yurok, 100 year old basket cap with the Little Stairway to Heaven design, gifted to the Author by her Grandpa Den at Wecpus in the late 1960s.  Photo by Kirk Sigurdson at Bear Creek 2017.

Traditional Yurok, 100 year old basket cap with the Little Stairway to Heaven design, gifted to the Author by her Grandpa Den at Wecpus in the late 1960s.  Photo by Kirk Sigurdson at Bear Creek 2017.

My name, Adisi Waya, translates to "Running Wolf" in Tsalagi. I was not raised in a Christian household.  I was raised in a modern world devoid of religion by one half of my family, and in a traditional Yurok world every summer with my Grandfather in Wecpus/Weitchpec on the shores of The Klamath River.   

A mixed blood, I am both white and First Nations. I am Cherokee Aniyunwiya by blood and Yurok, Pue-liklo’ or “Down-River-Indian,” by family ties.  I was schooled at a young age in wilderness tracking and awareness by a Modoc family friend, as well as schooled in the tradition of “Crying for Luck,” what the mainstream calls vision questing, from an indigenous Klamath perspective by my Grandfather.  I am most at home out in the land and always have been.

Because of my experience within a place called Severed Hand where I received my Hokep much later in my life, I have become the land.  If you were to ask me who I am today, I would answer that I am the hills and valleys of that place.  I am the rock walls and boulders; the wild Sage and Juniper.  I am the Vulture, the Red Hawk, the Jay, the Owl and the Coyote. I am the night time stars and the fierce wind in the high places. I am the wolf who has always walked beside me and within me.

In 1830-1850 my Rhea County TN Aniyunwiya ancestors walked the Trail of Tears to Oklahoma and then traveled across the continent to reach the Northwest coast. There they found themselves on what is now the Hoopa Valley Reservation, embraced by Karuk, Yurok, Modoc, Hupa and other indigenous Klamath peoples. They settled within a tiny pocket of Northwest people, the Yurok, who just like the Eastern tribes and the Aniyunwiya, thousands of miles away, also spoke a variation of the ancient Algonquin language.  My family still holds land on the river at the foot of Bald Hills.

Spending time in the Klamath area my childhood was filled with stories, teachings and legends.  It was also filled with archaeology and ancient Pre-Contact traditional structures used for vision questing, "crying for luck" and medicine making, found in the high places.  It was this early experience that supported my research of Severed Hand site.

I am not a degreed archaeologist or anthropologist; I am not a scientist. I possess a mere seventh grade math level at best.  My credibility, if you would call it that, was earned by experiencing, observing, and interacting with the numinous reality that both exists and doesn’t exist; walking the world in between the real and the unreal, the ordinary and non-ordinary. I have been “walking the path” and vision questing in an indigenous North American traditional manner all my life. 

Professionally, my task was to simply serve as an "on the ground" scout who located, mapped and documented Severed Hand’s structures for others.   Later, I was provided with scientific instruments to measure the unusual, and natural, earth energies found within the site of study.

Today, you can find me on the border of Pinchot-Gifford National Forest, with my two dogs, as I care for my 90 year old mother, a great-grand-niece of naturalist, author, and conservator John Muir. I prepare her for a conscious and meaningful death as she moves towards the final chapter of her story in this lifetime. It is my duty, my responsibility, and my honor.

I do not study or practice any native cultural aspects outside that which I have family ties to. I practice medicine making, or doctoring, in a traditional way. It is an indigenous version rooted firmly in my own culture of which I have inherited; my birthright. I make no apologies for who I am, or what I do, to Red or to White. My Hokep has changed me. I belong to no one; and no one belongs to me. I am simply, the land. 

I do not charge in any way for my writing, my experiences, medicine making, or knowledge.  It is my personal feeling that these gifts cannot be sold.

All proceeds from this book will be donated to tribal foundations.

 

Horus 2017

Horus 2017

Arwyn 2017

Arwyn 2017